Edorium Journal of

Disability and Rehabilitation

 
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Original Article
 
Impact of changes in economic status on catastrophic health expenditures among households with people with a disability in South Korea
Jae-Woo Choi1, Tae-Hyun Kim2, Jae-Hyun Kim1, Sang-Gyu Lee2, Eun-Cheol Park3
11Department of Public Health, Graduate School, Yonsei University, Seoul, Korea, Institute of Health Services Research, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
2Institute of Health Services Research, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea, Department of Hospital Administration, Graduate School of Public Health, Yonsei University, Seoul, Korea.
3Institute of Health Services Research, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea, Department of Preventive Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

Article ID: 100001D05JC2015
doi:10.5348/D05-2015-1-OA-1

Address correspondence to:
Eun-Cheol Park
MD, PhD, Department of Preventive Medicine and Institute of Health Services Research
Yonsei University College of Medicine, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu
Seoul 120-752
Korea
Phone: 82-2-2188-1862
Fax: 82-2-392-8133

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How to cite this article
Choi Jae-Woo, Kim Tae-Hyun, Kim Jae-Hyun, Lee Sang-Gyu, Park Eun-Cheol. Impact of changes in economic status on catastrophic health expenditures among households with people with a disability in South Korea. Edorium J Disabil Rehabil 2015;1:1–8.


Abstract
Aims: Although people with a disability need comprehensive and consistent healthcare services because they often have both common and disability-related health problems, their economic status may restrict healthcare service use. This study investigated the impact of economic status changes on catastrophic health expenditures (CHE) among people with a disability in South Korea.
Methods: We retrieved 4,065 household records from the Panel Survey of Employment for the Disabled (2010–2012) and explored potential relationships among disability status, economic change, and CHE. Results: Households in which people with a disability recently lost a job or had been unemployed [(Odds ratios (OR): 2.30, 1.68, respectively)] were more likely to incur CHE compared with those with a consistent job. In addition, households with people with a mild disability who either lost or gained a job or who was already unemployed (OR: 3.12, 2.10, 1.73, respectively) were more likely to incur CHE than households with people with a severe disability who had been supported by medical aid.
Conclusion: Households with people with a disability who experiences a change in job status are more likely to face barriers to needed healthcare services than those with no such change, indicating that job status may be a more significant factor for CHE than level of disability.

Keywords: Catastrophic health expenditure, Disability, Economic Status

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Author Contributions:
Jae-Woo Choi – Substantial contributions to conception and design, Drafting the article, Final approval of the version to be published
Tae-Hyun Kim – Substantial contributions to conception and design, Revising it critically for important intellectual content, Final approval of the version to be published
Jae-Hyun Kim – Analysis and interpretation of data, Revising it critically for important intellectual content, Final approval of the version to be published
Sang-Kyu Lee – Analysis and interpretation of data, Revising it critically for important intellectual content, Final approval of the version to be published
Eun-Cheol Park – Substantial contributions to conception and design, Revising it critically for important intellectual content, Final approval of the version to be published
Guarantor of submission
The corresponding author is the guarantor of submission.
Source of support
None
Conflict of interest
Authors declare no conflict of interest.
Copyright
© 2015 Jae-Woo Choi et al. This article is distributed under the terms of Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution and reproduction in any medium provided the original author(s) and original publisher are properly credited. Please see the copyright policy on the journal website for more information.



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