Edorium Journal of

Disability and Rehabilitation

 
     
Original Article
 
Establishing the key components of an eye gaze assessment for a child with a severe neurodisability using nominal group technique
Tylie Suzanne Stokes1, Paul Roden2
1Highly Specialist Occupational Therapist, Chailey Clinical Services, Beggars Wood Road, North Chailey, East Sussex, UK
2Lecturer, Occupational Therapy, Brunel University, Kingston Road, Uxbridge, Middlesex, UK

Article ID: 100032D05TS2017
doi:10.5348/D05-2017-32-OA-8

Address correspondence to:
Tylie Suzanne Stokes
Highly Specialist Occupational Therapist
Chailey Clinical Services, Beggars Wood Road
North Chailey, East Sussex
UK
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How to cite this article
Stokes TS, Roden P. Establishing the key components of an eye gaze assessment for a child with a severe neurodisability using nominal group technique. Edorium J Disabil Rehabil 2017;3:62–68.


ABSTRACT

Aims: Eye gaze devices enable users with a disability, to participate in computer activities using eye movements. Health professionals assess client’s ability to access such devices, yet there remains limited research to guide assessments particularly among children with severe neurodisability.
Methods: Nine health professionals, considered experts in digital assistive technologies, were recruited from special interest groups and service providers across England. Participants attended a focus group, seeking to establish consensus in response to the question: “What are the key components of an eye gaze assessment for a child with a severe neurodisability?” using nominal group technique. The discussion was recorded, transcribed and evaluated using content analysis.
Results: Components achieving highest consensus were; motivation, visual ability, posture, purpose of the device, cognition and ongoing support. The need to manage expectations was highlighted. A flexible, multi-disciplinary, health professional-led assessment was considered important.
Conclusion: Key components of an assessment were identified. The ability to have repeated flexible assessments further strengthen the assessment process. Further consideration should be given to managing client/family expectations and ensuring ongoing support is in place. Devices are more likely to be abandoned when neither a clear purpose for the device nor provision of ongoing support is identified during assessment.

Keywords: Assessment, Children, Eye-gaze, Neurodisability


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Acknowledgements

We would like to acknowledge:

  • Sussex Community NHS Trust and Chailey Clinical Services for supporting the research and funding the MSc which the research was undertaken to fulfill.
  • Brunel University for supporting and supervising the research and for supporting the publication of the research
  • All participants for their contributions
  • The Foundation for Assistive Technology (FAST) for advertising and assisting with the recruitment process


Author Contributions
Tylie Suzanne Stokes – Substantial contributions to conception and design, Acquisition of data, Analysis and interpretation of data, Drafting the article, Revising it critically for important intellectual content, Final approval of the version to be published
Paul Roden – Substantial contributions to conception and design, Revising it critically for important intellectual content, Final approval of the version to be published
Guarantor of submission
The corresponding author is the guarantor of submission.
Source of support
None
Conflict of interest
Authors declare no conflict of interest
Copyright
© 2017 Tylie Suzanne Stokes et al. This article is distributed under the terms of Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution and reproduction in any medium provided the original author(s) and original publisher are properly credited. Please see the copyright policy on the journal website for more information.


ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Tylie Stokes is a Highly Specialist Occupational Therapist at Chailey Clinical Services, Sussex Community NHS Foundation Trust. She earned undergraduate degree (Occupational Therapy) from Brunel University, London, UK and postgraduate degree (Neurological Rehabilitation) from Brunel University, London, UK. Her research interests include pediatric neurodisability, powered mobility and postural management.


Paul Roden is a Lecturer, Occupational Therapy, Brunel University, Kingston Road, Uxbridge, Middlesex, UB8, 3PH, UK.



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