Index Copernicus IC Value: 89.62
Edorium Journal of

Disability and Rehabilitation

 
     
Original Article
 
Exploring the impact of sharing personal narratives of brain injury through film in Australian Indigenous communities
Susan Gauld1, Sharon Smith1, Melissa Bianca Kendall2,3
1Rehabilitation Coordinator Acquired Brain Injury Outreach Service, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Metro South Health, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
2Senior Research Officer, Acquired Brain Injury Outreach Service (ABIOS) and Transitional Rehabilitation Program (TRP), Princess Alexandra Hospital, Metro South Health, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
3Associate Professor, the Hopkins Centre, Griffith University/Division of Rehabilitation-Metro South Health, Queensland, Australia

Article ID: 100037D05SG2018
doi: 10.5348/100037D05SG2018OA

Corresponding Author:
Melissa Bianca Kendall,
Senior Research Officer, ABIOS and TRP,
PO Box 6053, Buranda QLD Australia 4102

Access full text article on other devices

  Access PDF of article on other devices

[HTML Full Text]   [PDF Full Text] [Print This Article]
[Similar article in PubMed] [Similar article in Google Scholar]



How to cite this article
Gauld S, Smith S, Kendall MB. Exploring the impact of sharing personal narratives of brain injury through film in Australian Indigenous communities. Edorium J Disabil Rehabil 2018;4:100037D05SG2018.


ABSTRACT

Aims: Culturally appropriate community education about brain injury prevention and supporting people with brain injury and their families is needed in Australian Indigenous communities. Narrative therapy offers a useful method in rehabilitation that may be particularly appropriate for Indigenous people. This paper aims to explore and describe the impact of sharing personal stories on film by Australian Indigenous families who have experienced acquired brain injury (ABI).

Methods: Participatory Action Research approaches were used in the production of films describing personal stories of brain injury for three Australian Indigenous men and their families. Participants were involved in the conceptualization, development, filming and launch of the films in their own communities (one urban, one rural and one remote). The production of the films was followed by individual semi-structured interviews with film participants. Thematic analysis of interview data was undertaken. Results: While produced as an educational digital video disc (DVD) resource for improving brain injury prevention awareness and support in Australian Indigenous communities, participants identified five themes related to the benefits and challenges of the narrative filmmaking process, namely the motivation to tell their story, the experience of making the film, the social impact and benefits, the importance of the launch and the untold stories that remain.

Conclusion: Storytelling by Australian Indigenous families through film was perceived by individuals with ABI and their families to have important personal benefits in addition to providing a culturally relevant community education resource. A recognition of the film as merely a snapshot in time is necessary however and ongoing opportunities for storytelling should be sought. Community launches of such resources are important for supporting families affected by brain injury and increasing awareness in their communities.

Keywords: Acquired brain injury, Community education, Indigenous health, Narrative therapy, Storytelling


[HTML Full Text]   [PDF Full Text]

Acknowledgements
We would like to acknowledge the contributions of the Australian Indigenous communities who participated in the research and production of the DVD and the provision of funding for the DVD by the Motor Accident Insurance Council of Queensland (MAIC).
Author Contributions
Susan Gauld – Substantial contributions to conception and design, Acquisition of data, Analysis and interpretation of data, Drafting the article, Revising it critically for important intellectual content, Final approval of the version to be published
Sharon Smith – Substantial contributions to conception and design, Acquisition of data, Analysis and interpretation of data, Drafting the article, Revising it critically for important intellectual content, Final approval of the version to be published
Melissa Bianca Kendall – Substantial contributions to conception and design, Analysis and interpretation of data, Drafting the article, Revising it critically for important intellectual content, Final approval of the version to be published
Guarantor of Submission
The corresponding author is the guarantor of submission.
Source of Support
None
Consent Statement
Written informed consent was obtained from the patient for publication of this study.
Conflict of Interest
Author declares no conflict of interest.
Copyright
© 2018 Susan Gauld et al. This article is distributed under the terms of Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution and reproduction in any medium provided the original author(s) and original publisher are properly credited. Please see the copyright policy on the journal website for more information.



  Terms of Service line Privacy policy line Disclaimer line FAQ line Contact: Journal line Contact: Edorium Journals line Site Map  
  Copyright © 2018. Edorium. All rights reserved.